When should my child visit then dentist and what will happen?

As soon as your child’s first tooth appears, it’s time to schedule a dental visit. The ADA recommends that the first dental visit take place within six months after the first tooth appears, but no later than a child’s first birthday. Don’t wait for them to start school or until there’s an emergency. Get your child comfortable today with good mouth healthy habits.

Although the first visit is mainly for the dentist to examine your child’s mouth and to check growth and development, it’s also about your child being comfortable. To make the visit positive:

•Consider making a morning appointment when children tend to be rested and cooperative.

•Keep any anxiety or concerns you have to yourself. Children can pick up on your emotions, so emphasize the positive.

•Never use a dental visit as a punishment or threat.

•Never bribe your child.

•Talk with your child about visiting the dentist.

During this visit, you can expect the dentist to:

•Inspect for oral injuries, cavities or other problems.

•Let you know if your child is at risk of developing tooth decay.

•Clean your child’s teeth and provide tips for daily care.

•Discuss teething, pacifier use, or finger/thumbsucking habits.

•Discuss treatment, if needed, and schedule the next check-up

What does a pediatric dentist do?

Pediatric dental offices are colorful, fun, and child-friendly. Dental phobias are often rooted in childhood, so it is essential that the child feel comfortable, safe, and trusting of the dentist from the outset.

The pediatric dentist focuses on several different forms of oral care:

Prevention – Tooth decay is the most prevalent childhood ailment. Fortunately, it is almost completely preventable. Aside from providing advice and guidance relating to home care, the pediatric dentist can apply sealants and fluoride treatments to protect tooth enamel and minimize the risk of cavities.

Early detection – Examinations, X-rays, and computer modeling allow the pediatric dentist to predict future oral problems. Examples include malocclusion (bad bite), attrition due to grinding (bruxism), and jaw irregularities. In some cases, optimal outcomes are best achieved by starting treatment early.

Treatment – Pediatric dentists offer a wide range of treatments. Aside from preventative treatments (fluoride and sealant applications), the pediatric dentist also performs pulp therapy and treats oral trauma. If primary teeth are lost too soon, space maintainers may be provided to ensure the teeth do not become misaligned.

Education – Education is a major part of any pediatric practice. Not only can the pediatric dentist help the child understand the importance of daily oral care, but parents can also get advice on toothpaste selection, diet, thumb-sucking cessation, and a wide range of related topics.

Updates – Pediatric dentists are well informed about the latest advances in the dentistry field. For example, Xylitol (a naturally occurring sugar substitute) has recently been shown to protect young teeth against cavities, tooth decay, and harmful bacteria. Children who do not see the dentist regularly may miss out on both beneficial information and information about new diagnostic procedures.

Drink Healthy

As we welcome the warmer weather it is important to stay hydrated. Is your child’s sweet tooth harming their teeth as well as the overall health? Help create a healthier lifestyle for your child and make the switch!

Happy Red Nose Day!!!

This year Red Noses, which raises awareness and funds to help children in need, arrived with a touch of silver sparkle, because giving children a brighter future is something to celebrate!

Easter Candy and Cavities

It’s not the sugar from the candy itself that gives your kids cavities, but rather what happens in their mouth after they eat the sugar. Some types of bacteria in the mouth feed on the sugars to create acids that destroy tooth enamel. Those acids create a bacterial infection that makes holes in teeth. Without treatment, cavities can go deeper into layers of the tooth, causing pain and possible tooth loss.

Tips to Prevent Cavities at Easter:
Give Easter treats that aren’t candy. Some good options for children include:
>Art and craft supplies like stickers, paints, markers, and yarn.
>Travel games, puzzles, yo-yos, and mini-figurines.
>Books about Easter.
>Outdoor toys like bubbles, sidewalk chalk, and jump ropes.
>Toothbrushes and floss (our favorite).

Ensure that they’re brushing twice a day and flossing regularly. Give them water to drink, and as always, we recommend bringing them in for a cleaning and exam twice a year!

Too Many Sweets? The Harmful Effect of Sugar on Kids’ Teeth

All kids like the occasional treat, but too many high-sugar snacks can have a major impact on their health. Experts recommend that children consume less than six teaspoons of added sugars per day, which is the equivalent of about 25 grams or 100 calories. Consuming more than the recommended amount can significantly reduce their risk of developing a wide range of health problems, including tooth decay. While we all know that sugar is bad for our children’s health, just how bad is it?

How Tooth Decay Develops

The mouth is full of bacteria, many which are beneficial to your unique oral environment. However, the ‘bad’ bacteria can wreak havoc on teeth if you consume the wrong foods in excess. When you consume sugary foods, the bacteria in your mouth feed on the sugar, creating acids that destroy tooth enamel. Over time, the acids will create a hole in the tooth. If left untreated, the hole can reach the deeper layers of the tooth causing pain and eventually tooth loss.

Our team had a great time at the YMCA New Year New You Health Fair! Thanks to all of our friends our animals now have bright and shiny teeth!

Sealants

Sealants, or plastic coatings that cover the surface of teeth (particularly molars and premolars), help prevent tooth decay by smoothing out uneven surfaces where bacteria and acids could get trapped.